Clients, I welcome you to

The Portfolio of Whitcomb Touby Johnstone

Web Designer, Web Developer, and Adobe Illustrator Wizard

I’m a student of web design and development, and that also involves learning graphic design. I have internships at OSU Newark Campus and the Robbins Hunter Museum.

Managed or Built by Me

My final effort for the Robbins Hunter Museum
Gothic Child's Chair

A Treasure from the Collection
of Mr. Robbins Hunter, Jr.


This chair was made in the Gothic or Cathedral style that generally followed but was partly contemporary with the Greek Revival style exemplified by the Avery-Downer House. It is the right size for a child who is old enough to sit upright but younger than six.
The artifact was acquired by Mr. Robbins Hunter, Jr. from the Buxton-Upham house in Johnstown, Ohio, shown in this black-and-white photo. The oldest part of this house was built "circa 1830" in the Victorian Gothic Revival style, so this chair would have matched the architecture. At the time this chair was made and given, only the first section of the house (shown on the left in this photo) had been built. The Italianate tower and rear section were built onto the house in the 1860s. Unfortunately, the house was torn down in 2009. 


This chair is embroidered with the words "1847 FATHER TO J. E. U." as well as a picture of a horse. Preliminary research suggests that the recipient of this chair was James Edward Jarvis Upham, the third and last child of George Upham. James was born in 1846, one year before the embroidery on the chair, which is suggestive. More than likely, the chair was bought in 1846 very shortly after J. E. U. was born, and given to the child as soon as the embroidery was complete, with the year being done last. After all, needlework projects take a great deal of time to complete, and the embroiders of the 1840s did not have the advantage of strong electric light!

At 18, James Edward Upham enlisted in an Ohio regiment and fought for the Union in the American Civil War. He survived the war and married Belle Sampson, whose mother was a Buxton, and they had two children, George (1874), and Herman (1875). J. E. U. passed away in 1930, well into his 80s.

James and Belle Upham's younger son Herman married Ethel Hunter, the sister of Mr. Robbins Hunter, Sr. This would make Ethel and Herman the aunt and uncle of Mr. Robbins Hunter, Jr., the antique dealer whose bequest founded our museum.

James and Belle Upham's older son George was noted as mayor of Johnstown and lived at 18 Coshocton St. in Johnstown, the Buxton-Upham house. He was married to Maude, who was also a Buxton. He died in 1962. 

It is very probable that Robbins Hunter, Jr. purchased the chair from J.E.U,'s son, George!  
This is the third and (for now) last of a series of emails about artifacts in our collection.

Special thanks to the Johnstown Historical Society and the Licking County Historical Society for their help in researching this artifact.
This is my final email sent on behalf of Robbins Hunter Museum, the third and best in a series on artifacts created by me. I am responsible for the photography, retouching the photos in Photoshop, writing copy, and doing the research that went into the copy.
Buy-A-Brick campaign email for the Robbins Hunter Museum. I’m very proud of the classic design in this email.

Before I worked my magic, this was a plain, non-fallible PDF that had to be turned in. Now there are Word and PDF versions both fillable.

Robbins Hunter Museum website, managed in Squaresapace with custom HTML code additions. Taken over by me as of 3/4/2020.
Trinity Episcopal Church, Newark OH. Taken over by me in 2015 and completely revamped. Entire site managed by me in Google Sites.
COTC Online New Student Orientation- Academics Section. Created in Moodle.
Victoria Woodhull: Phoenix Rising email I made via Constant Contact. “Tonight” banner custom made by me in illustrator.
COTC Intranet: Updated Contact Info across Multiple Pages in SharePoint
screenshot of www.cotc.edu
Updated plans of study for 2020-2021 school year in SharePoint.

See my blog for my more minor projects and views on design.